Painting > Objects

Blue Castle
Oil on Canvas
48" x 48"
Big Red Roses
Oil on Canvas
48" x 48"
Blue and Gold
Oil on Canvas
24" x 24"
 Big Japanese
Oil on Canvas
24" x 24"
2012
Green and Gold
Oil on Canvas
24" x 24"
Pink Roses
SOLD
Oil on Canvas
24" x 24"
2012
Yellow and Pink
Oil on Canvas
2018
Fruit Inside Teacup
Oil on Board
12" x 12"
2004
Inner Blue Teacup
Oil on Board
12" x 12"
2004
Purple Flower Teacup
Oil on Board
12" x 12"
2004
Pear Teacup
Oil on Board
12" x 12"
2004
Apple Green Teacup
Oil on Board
12" x 12"
2004
Mom's Teacup
Oil on Board
12" x 12"
2004
Passover Teacup
SOLD
Oil on Board
12" x 12"
2004
Blue/Gold Teacup
Oil on Board
12" x 12"
2004
Prim Teacup
Oil on Board
12" x 12"
2004
Empire Teacup
Oil on Board
12" x 12"
2004
Niehaus Teacup
SOLD
Oil on Board
12" x 12"
2004
Orange Floral
Oil on Panel
12" x 12"
2012
Vincent's Teacup
SOLD
Oil on Board
12" x 12"
2004
Japanese House Teacup
Oil on Panel
12" x 12"
2004
Yellow & Pink
Oil on Panel
12" x 12"
2012
Delft Teacup
SOLD
Oil on Board
12" x 12" sold
2004
Purple Vine Teacup
Oil on Board
12" x 12"
2004
Blue & Gold
Oil on Panel
12" x 12"
2012
Creamer
Oil on Canvas
4' x 4'
Irene's Gravy Boat
Oil on Canvas
4' x 8'
Sugar Bowl
Oil on Canvas
4' x 4'
horowitz matzos
Oil on Canvas
14" x 14"

What You See is What a You Get
Elizabeth Johnson
The Easton Irregular

Emily approaches her subjects--teacups, old buildings, matzo cracker boxes, asparagus, the human figure--with equanimity and imbues them with the unique, wobbly energy that emanates from her hand. If you funneled the strange vitality of Charles Burchfield through the clear structure of Edward Hopper, you would get Emily Steinberg’s emotional portraits of everyday subjects.

With the teacups, bold brushstrokes depict the decorative pattern as well as the form, distinguishing the interior and exterior surfaces. Smooth areas of flat color calm the eye and conjure the feeling of cool porcelain against your cheek. When I met Emily in her studio in Philadelphia, I was shocked to see the actual teacups she used: they were like movie stars at the airport--tired, annoyed, tightlipped and grim. How did she discover and express so much drama in china? Each cup has its own personality, and her skill at creating characters suggests a story. The cups remind her of her mom who “liked her cup of tea” and evoke imaginary women dressed plain to fancy.

When describing her painting style Emily remarks, “What you see is what you get,” I would add that she knows when to paint colorful, complicated passages and when to leave well enough alone. She creates a model for the human emotions of attachment and detachment. To return to those teacups: everyday objects are transformed into emotional, sentient beings, and as a group of 16, they represent a cross section of society. Emily is the painter’s version of Honoré de Balzac, author of The Human Comedy. Balzac also measured description, creating comic, tragic characters. A Realist, he saw the world ruin the weak and champion the strong and his sarcastic humor eases the pain of human failure. Juxtaposing gnarly patches of paint with smooth ones, Emily creates independent, talkative, female characters in all their contradictions. Witty and candid, they are more than happy to reveal their frailties, struggles and triumphs.